Southern Culture on the Skids w/ The Bopcats and Big Mama Shakes

Southern Culture on the Skids w/ The Bopcats and Big Mama Shakes

The Bopcats, Big Mama Shakes

Sat, June 10, 2017

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

The Broadberry

Richmond, VA

$15 ADV, $18 DOS

Tickets at the Door

VIP Sections and Reserved Tables are available here.

Southern Culture on the Skids
Southern Culture on the Skids
Southern Culture On The Skids has been spreading the rock and roll gospel since since they formed in Chapel Hill, NC in 1983. Guitarist/singer Rick Miller, drummer Dave Hartman and bassist/singer/heartbreaker Mary Huff, play a greasy mix of surf, rockabilly, R&B and country-fried garage with a side of psych, all the while driving fans into ecstatic, sweat-drenched paroxysms of joy. It's a musical gumbo Miller calls, “Americana from the wrong side of the tracks.“ The band has been prolific and ubiquitous for over thirty years, touring everywhere from the North Carolina Prison System to Mt. Fuji, Japan and delivering what Rolling Stone calls “a hell raising rock and roll party.“
In 2014 the band was honored by the Southern Folk Life Collection at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill with an exhibition featuring their music and cultural contributions. The flame-adorned La-Z-Boy from the cover of their Plastic Seat Sweat LP now resides at UNC-CH!
THE ELECTRIC PINECONES
Southern Culture On The Skids' newest album, The Electric Pinecones, will be released on September 16, 2016. It's the band's fifth album on their own label, Kudzu Records. The album features 12 original SCOTS tunes - 11 brand new songs and a whole-lotta NOLA remake of the SCOTS classic, “Swamp Fox - The Original.“ All the tunes were produced and recorded at Rick's studio in NC, The Kudzu Ranch.
The Electric Pinecones is a bit of a departure for the band conceptually and sonically. The inspiration for the record was born in an alter-ego side project from the early years of the band. “The Pinecones was folk-a-hill-a-billy garage band we used to put together just for kicks,“ Miller relates. “We loved the sound of '60s west coast folk rock and psych bands. The Pinecones was our outlet for material that was not in the SCOTS vein. We even opened for ourselves occasionally. The Pinecones set list was the jumping off point for this latest collection of songs.“
The first single off the album, “Grey Skies,“ is a minor key mood piece with that folk-a-billy, psychedelic sound. Listen to how the acoustic 12-string riff slides into the band's hypnotic rhythms that propel Mary Huff's reflective vocal into the mind's eye of times past and love lost. “Check out the Mellotron on the chorus - that is a first for us,“ Miller says.
The lead off track, “Freak Flag,“ is more upbeat, but no less tweaked, with modulating guitars riding on pounding drums after the first verse. The song's message is a good one - it is okay to be different and always respect yourself. The band debuted the song to an auditorium full of rowdy students at Carrboro Elementary School. “I was nervous,“ Miller says “if the kids don't like something they let you know, but when they started singing along with the second chorus and waving their imaginary freak flags in the air, I knew it was a hit!“
“Dirt Road“ is Mary's three-minute ode to sances, thunderstorms and good lovin' long gone. The song is a backwoods southern gothic ghost story that opens with a big tom fill then twists and turns around a folky strum and a fuzz guitar. Mary's spooky-good vocal takes it down that dirt road way back into the piney woods.
The album also has some country rock songs that highlight the melodic side of SCOTS, with “Baby I Like You,“ “I Ain't Gonna Hang Around“ and “Given To Me“ featuring some of the best harmonies Rick and Mary have ever recorded.“Waiting On You“ is the longest song on the album, coming in at 4:22; it's a folk-garage-rocker with a sing-a-long chorus that segues into a surf raga breakdown before heading back to the big riff and out.
The album has traditional Southern Culture flavor too. Check out the remake of “Swamp Fox - The Original“. This take goes back to the beginnings of the song and is much closer to capturing the essence of the many all-nighters the band pulled in NOLA with friends and colleagues. The country funk of “Rice and Beans,“ is a good humored tale of a cash strapped southern courtship, and “Midnight Caller“ is Mary's slinky R'n'B flavored woman-to-woman warning about bad men looking for good times.
Song for song, on The Electric Pinecones, Southern Culture On The Skids continues to blow minds and blur the lines between genres delivering a stellar album. From their 1985 debut Voodoo Beach Party, to their 1988 international smash, Dirt Track Date (featuring the hit single “Camel Walk“), and now to the SCOTS-ified tunes of The Electric Pinecones, 30 years, 200 songs and 1,000,000 road miles in, Southern Culture On The Skids just continues to get better with time.
The Bopcats
The Bopcats
Band inspired by the '50s : Bopcats want the artists of that decade to be remembered - Richmond Times-Dispatch Nov 25, 2004

The Bopcats swung into The Tobacco Company, 1201 E. Cary St., on Nov. 17 and performed three sets of rock'n' roll from the '50s.

As the band imitated some of the decade's most influential artists, the audience danced, sang along to the familiar tunes and seemed to step through a time machine to arrive in the'50s at a sock hop.

Straightforward drum beats, walking bass lines and light guitar strumming combined to create the rockabilly toe-tapping sound of the decade the band said it has worked to emulate. Rogers, Fralin and Hammond took turns as lead singer with songs such as "Heartbreak Hotel" by Elvis and "Great Balls of Fire" by Jerry Lee Lewis.

The band members said a love for the music is what fuels them to learn and play songs from decades ago. They remember the music being important to them in their youth and do not want people to forget the artists who have shaped what music is today.

"Most all of us were very small when this music was out but we still remember it," Rogers said. "I remember seeing Elvis on TV. There's just this general excitement to this era of music."

Why do you choose to play music from the '50s? "I love it personally," Rogers said. "The main reason that I like it is because it makes me move. I can't dance at all. I'm a terrible dancer, but you got to be dead if you don't tap your toes to this stuff. It just gets in my bones. I just find it to be the most exciting music there is."

Why do you play mostly cover songs? "We play a few originals," Rogers said, "but there are so many of these great covers. We can write some songs but with this era of music you're still gonna wanna play 'Blue Suede Shoes.'"

Why do you think it's important to expose people to musicians from the '50s? "'Cause most of the artists that we cover were fabulous," Rogers said. "They were great artists. They were great musicians and they wrote terrific music." Fralin said the music they wrote stands the test of time. "I don't get sick of these songs whereas a lot of modern stuff is interesting, but how many songs written in the past 20 years really stick in your head after they're 15 years old."

How do you think audiences connect with the songs you play? "We thrive on feedback from the crowd whether they're laughing or dancing," Fralin said. "A lot of young people like the older style because there's a lot of depth to the songs." Rogers said they have wide range of people who come to the shows, including people who grew up with the music. "There's a lot of nostalgia involved. They remember these songs from their youth and there's a lot of happiness involved in that."

What can people expect to see at your live show? "They can tell we love this kind of music," Rogers said. "We put our heart and souls into it. We hope they like it and hope they appreciate it. They can tell we're not up there doing it just to try to please someone else. We're doing it to please ourselves" - Angie Castlebury -
Big Mama Shakes
Big Mama Shakes
Big Mama Shakes
At its core: Big Mama Shakes is synonymous with rock and roll. I don't mean that in the pretentious "I'm an artistic genius" kind of way that John Lennon or Robbie Robertson might have; I mean it in the most painfully fun and raucously raw way one can experience rock and roll.

Kings of Leon:
Initially embraced as "the Southern Strokes" for their resurrection and reinvention of Dixie-styled rock & roll, Kings of Leon steadily morphed into an experimental rock outfit during the 2000s. The Tennessee-bred quartet debuted in 2003 with the Holy Roller Novocaine EP, whose blend of raw, unpolished boogie rock was further explored on their debut full-length, Youth & Young Manhood. Such revivalist music was matched by a similarly revivalist appearance -- including long hair, mustaches, and tight-fitting denim -- and Kings of Leon experienced immediate popularity in the U.K. (where they would later enjoy platinum album sales, despite an initially lukewarm reception at home). As the band explored different sonic textures with subsequent releases, most notably on 2007's Because of the Times and 2008's Only by the Night, those tenuous links to the Strokes were finally dissolved.
Comprised of three Followill brothers -- Caleb (guitar), Nathan (drums), and Jared (bass) -- as well as first cousin Matthew Followill (guitar), Kings of Leon formed in 2000. The Followill siblings had spent their youth traveling across America's heartland with their evangelist father, decamping at Pentecostal churches and tent revivals for several days at a time before moving onward. When their father resigned from the church and divorced his wife in 1997, the boys relocated to Nashville and embraced the rock music (not to mention the accompanying lifestyle) they'd previously been denied. Cousin Matthew was added to the lineup, and a Southern garage rock sound quickly emerged. RCA took note, signing the band in 2001 and facilitating a partnership with Nashville-based producer Angelo Petraglia, who furthered the band's rock & roll education and co-wrote the material for 2003's Holy Roller Novocaine EP.

Tours across North America and the U.K. coincided with the release of the band's full-length debut, Youth & Young Manhood, that same summer. Thanks to the popular single "Molly's Chambers," the album found moderate success in the U.K. However, it was their sophomore effort, 2004's Aha Shake Heartbreak, that made them European stars, with three songs cracking the U.K. charts. The album saw an American release in February 2005, and Kings of Leon toured the country alongside U2 before retreating to work on their third effort. The darker, expansive Because of the Timesfollowed in 2007. Featuring production from Ethan Johns (who had helmed the band's previous releases as well), the album proved to be the band's biggest release to date, debuting at number 25 on the U.S. Billboard 200 and topping the album charts in the U.K., Ireland, and New Zealand.
Kings of Leon returned one year later with Only by the Night, a colossally popular album whose lead single, "Sex on Fire," gave the band its first number one hit in the U.K. The album itself fared similarly well, topping the U.K. charts upon its release and debuting at number four in America. It eventually gained platinum status in eight countries, including America, and its success allowed the band to tour heavily throughout much of 2008 and 2009. Live at the O2 was released in late 2009, capturing one of the band's midsummer performances in London. Kings of Leon briefly holed up in Manhattan's Avatar Studios to work on a fifth record, but they returned to the road during the summer of 2010, taking the opportunity to play some of their new material in concert. By the time the tour wrapped up in September, the group's newest single, "Radioactive," had already been released. The accompanying album, Come Around Sundown, followed in October. The record was a worldwide hit and reached number one in 15 countries, including the U.S., U.K., Canada, and Australia.

Later that year they embarked on a marathon tour; however, a disastrous show in Texas resulted in frontman Caleb walking off the stage without returning for the end of the set. After this incident, the brothers decided to undertake a self-imposed hiatus in 2011 and canceled the rest of the tour while the band attempted to reconcile their personal and group problems. In the time apart, bassist Jared released music with Mona frontman Nick Brownunder the moniker Smoke & Jackal, while Caleb found sobriety after moving to New York and the birth of his son. They returned to the band with a batch of new material and set to work on their sixth record, Mechanical Bull, which appeared in September of 2013. Buoyed by the single "Supersoaker," the album reached number two on the Billboard 200 and garnered a nomination for Best Rock Album at the 56th Annual Grammy Awards.
Following the end of the band's 2014-2015 Mechanical Bull tour, Kings of Leon revealed they had already begun work on a follow-up. In 2016, they released their seventh studio album, WALLS. Produced in Los Angeles with Markus Dravs (Florence + the Machine, Arcade Fire, Mumford & Sons), the album featured the single "Waste a Moment." - All Music
Venue Information:
The Broadberry
2729 W. Broad Street
Richmond, VA, 23220
http://www.thebroadberry.com