Big Mama Shakes, Sid Kingsley, Tigerman woah, Landon Elliott

Big Mama Shakes

Sid Kingsley

Tigerman woah

Landon Elliott

Sat, August 19, 2017

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

The Broadberry

Richmond, VA

$10 ADV, $12 DOS

Tickets at the Door

This event is all ages

Big Mama Shakes
Big Mama Shakes
Big Mama Shakes
At its core: Big Mama Shakes is synonymous with rock and roll. I don't mean that in the pretentious "I'm an artistic genius" kind of way that John Lennon or Robbie Robertson might have; I mean it in the most painfully fun and raucously raw way one can experience rock and roll.

Kings of Leon:
Initially embraced as "the Southern Strokes" for their resurrection and reinvention of Dixie-styled rock & roll, Kings of Leon steadily morphed into an experimental rock outfit during the 2000s. The Tennessee-bred quartet debuted in 2003 with the Holy Roller Novocaine EP, whose blend of raw, unpolished boogie rock was further explored on their debut full-length, Youth & Young Manhood. Such revivalist music was matched by a similarly revivalist appearance -- including long hair, mustaches, and tight-fitting denim -- and Kings of Leon experienced immediate popularity in the U.K. (where they would later enjoy platinum album sales, despite an initially lukewarm reception at home). As the band explored different sonic textures with subsequent releases, most notably on 2007's Because of the Times and 2008's Only by the Night, those tenuous links to the Strokes were finally dissolved.
Comprised of three Followill brothers -- Caleb (guitar), Nathan (drums), and Jared (bass) -- as well as first cousin Matthew Followill (guitar), Kings of Leon formed in 2000. The Followill siblings had spent their youth traveling across America's heartland with their evangelist father, decamping at Pentecostal churches and tent revivals for several days at a time before moving onward. When their father resigned from the church and divorced his wife in 1997, the boys relocated to Nashville and embraced the rock music (not to mention the accompanying lifestyle) they'd previously been denied. Cousin Matthew was added to the lineup, and a Southern garage rock sound quickly emerged. RCA took note, signing the band in 2001 and facilitating a partnership with Nashville-based producer Angelo Petraglia, who furthered the band's rock & roll education and co-wrote the material for 2003's Holy Roller Novocaine EP.

Tours across North America and the U.K. coincided with the release of the band's full-length debut, Youth & Young Manhood, that same summer. Thanks to the popular single "Molly's Chambers," the album found moderate success in the U.K. However, it was their sophomore effort, 2004's Aha Shake Heartbreak, that made them European stars, with three songs cracking the U.K. charts. The album saw an American release in February 2005, and Kings of Leon toured the country alongside U2 before retreating to work on their third effort. The darker, expansive Because of the Timesfollowed in 2007. Featuring production from Ethan Johns (who had helmed the band's previous releases as well), the album proved to be the band's biggest release to date, debuting at number 25 on the U.S. Billboard 200 and topping the album charts in the U.K., Ireland, and New Zealand.
Kings of Leon returned one year later with Only by the Night, a colossally popular album whose lead single, "Sex on Fire," gave the band its first number one hit in the U.K. The album itself fared similarly well, topping the U.K. charts upon its release and debuting at number four in America. It eventually gained platinum status in eight countries, including America, and its success allowed the band to tour heavily throughout much of 2008 and 2009. Live at the O2 was released in late 2009, capturing one of the band's midsummer performances in London. Kings of Leon briefly holed up in Manhattan's Avatar Studios to work on a fifth record, but they returned to the road during the summer of 2010, taking the opportunity to play some of their new material in concert. By the time the tour wrapped up in September, the group's newest single, "Radioactive," had already been released. The accompanying album, Come Around Sundown, followed in October. The record was a worldwide hit and reached number one in 15 countries, including the U.S., U.K., Canada, and Australia.

Later that year they embarked on a marathon tour; however, a disastrous show in Texas resulted in frontman Caleb walking off the stage without returning for the end of the set. After this incident, the brothers decided to undertake a self-imposed hiatus in 2011 and canceled the rest of the tour while the band attempted to reconcile their personal and group problems. In the time apart, bassist Jared released music with Mona frontman Nick Brownunder the moniker Smoke & Jackal, while Caleb found sobriety after moving to New York and the birth of his son. They returned to the band with a batch of new material and set to work on their sixth record, Mechanical Bull, which appeared in September of 2013. Buoyed by the single "Supersoaker," the album reached number two on the Billboard 200 and garnered a nomination for Best Rock Album at the 56th Annual Grammy Awards.
Following the end of the band's 2014-2015 Mechanical Bull tour, Kings of Leon revealed they had already begun work on a follow-up. In 2016, they released their seventh studio album, WALLS. Produced in Los Angeles with Markus Dravs (Florence + the Machine, Arcade Fire, Mumford & Sons), the album featured the single "Waste a Moment." - All Music
Sid Kingsley
Sid Kingsley
"Armed with a towering voice, clear message, and expansive tone, Kingsley has put together an incredible collection of gripping songs that freely and boldly explore the broad umbrella that is Americana. This record is overflowing with the heart and spirit of its musicians, most notably Kingsley himself who erupts at times with a bellow akin to legendary musician Levon Helm. It’s Kingsley’s voice and hand that make Good Way Home so compelling, so cathartic, and so unbelievably spectacular. Saying this is one of Richmond’s finest Americana releases in its storied history is a bold proclamation, but dive only a minute into the first song of the record and you’ll know it’s true."
-DustUp Mag

"Sid Kingsley is a modest man. He doesn’t think of himself as any more than simply a journeyman musician. After a few false starts, he came to the realization that making music was all he ever wanted to do, and while he doesn’t trumpet his skill and ability, it’s obvious at the outset that the man is easily one of the most talented artists making his bow in recent memory. He’s content to write and record his songs. But the profound talent at work here is evident upon hearing the opening title track of Good Way Home -- talent that boasts a wellspring of honesty and conviction, fresh and formative with a wisdom and authenticity that’s as old as the ages.
That can clearly be heard in the songs -- the driving and dynamic “Lady in the Wall,” the instantly affecting “These Are the Reasons,” the reflective and resonating take on American traditional “Moonshiner,” and the surprisingly sprightly “Rat on a Wheel,” among many. Kingsley clearly has a gift, one that binds melody, a message and a purpose for being. If we were seeking an heir apparent to Townes Van Zandt, Van Morrison and John Prine, Kingsley would be on the short list. Little wonder that a raging version of Prine’s “Sam Stone” and a surprisingly funky take on the timeless traditional classic “Wild Mountain Thyme” are also in his set list.
If all this sounds like the usual hyperbole accorded many newcomers, then all it takes is a listen to the aforementioned Good Way Home to demonstrate otherwise. And Kingsley’s background suggests he’s not prone to exaggerating. Raised in the tiny town (pop. 111) of Branchville, Virginia on the North Carolina border, he spent his younger years immersed in the historical environs of the Old South, in the land of cotton growers, peanut farmers, and indigenous American Indians -- and the place that birthed Nat Turner’s slave insurrection in 1831. Kingsley’s father took him to visit those houses where the violence took place when he was a kid.
“One house in particular still has blood stains on the floor,” Kingsley recalled. “There are plenty of ghosts stories still being shared there.”
Kingsley grew up surrounded with music, watching his grandmother play piano and organ, or listening to his father play drums. Kingsley loved it all -- classical, jazz, r&b, pop and country -- but especially jazz. Drawn to the Glenn Miller Orchestra, he was inspired to pick up saxophone, and by the time he was in fifth grade it had become so much of an obsession, he began begging his parents to buy him one.
“The town I grew up in had very few people and even less children, so I really had no one to hang out with most of my childhood. My friends were the musicians that played on the records in my father’s collection. He would bring me a new jazz record nearly every day. I discovered artists like Joshua Redman and fell in the love with the sound.”
Despite being a soloist in his high school jazz band, he was still shy about his playing: “It was my little secret, something I knew about myself that most others didn't.” He was a serious jazz snob, and intensely insecure about his own growing talent. Despite incessant practice that left his lips bleeding, he avoided auditions and shied from the spotlight.
After high school, Kingsley decided to join the Coast Guard, following the same military path as many members of his family. Even there, his love for music didn’t fade from view: one commanding officer insisted he share his talents with his fellow recruits. “I wasn't in a position to say no, being that I was in boot camp and all,” he says.
Shortly thereafter, the same CO arranged for him to represent his unit performing “The Star Spangled Banner” at the nearby Cape May Jazz Festival. When jazz great Jimmy Heath heard him playing backstage, he was stunned, and quickly assured him that he had what it took to succeed as a musician.
College came next, but after starting in one school and transferring to another, he came to realize that an educational experience wasn’t for him. “I enrolled in a music program, but decided I didn't want to do it,” he admits. “Music school took away all the joy from music. There were just too many rules.”
He meandered for a few years, during which time his music threatened to become just a hobby. He abandoned the saxophone, and began dabbling in piano. He indulged a sudden desire to hitchhike for months to the west coast. Finally, he moved to Richmond, Virginia and found the stability he was seeking. He began playing in other people’s bands, and realized he had the resolve he lacked for so long. The result is Good Way Home, an album that brings those hard-learned experiences full circle.
“To record this album meant finally getting all of my ideas and songs in a concrete form, and it was amazing having someone believe in what I was singing to want to even lay it down,” Kingsley says. “I hope the people that hear the record can feel the love and care that went into its making. Music for me is a really personal thing, and finally having the courage to share it with other people really means a lot.”
Lee zimmerman (Popmatters, no depression)
Landon Elliott
Landon Elliott
From a small town on the sandbars off the coast of North Carolina to the fanning asphalt of Richmond, VA; somewhere between the soft orange glow of the sunsets on those shores and the exposing neons of his new fluorescent city, you find Landon Elliott and his sound.Through feeling love and loss, growing older, experiencing shame and loneliness, and finding both freedom and challenges in doubt, his vulnerability and storytelling leads listeners behind his eyes to a view that seems oddly familiar. With one foot firmly set in heartland and the other dipping into indie rock, we find Landon in a headspace as diverse as the city of Richmond where he now resides. Whether listening with held breathe or screaming at the top of your lungs, there is a place for you at the table to enjoy his songs. Landon Elliott is on American Paradox Music (Richmond, VA) and is scheduled to release music in 2019.
Venue Information:
The Broadberry
2729 W. Broad Street
Richmond, VA, 23220
http://www.thebroadberry.com