Beach Slang, Ann Beretta (Record Release Show!)

The Trigger System/RVA Shows Presents!

Beach Slang

Ann Beretta (Record Release Show!)

Pet Symmetry, Positive No

Sat, October 21, 2017

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

The Broadberry

Richmond, VA

$17.00 - $20.00

Off Sale

This event is all ages

Beach Slang
Beach Slang
We've been waiting for a while and finally it's here. Over the past two years Beach Slang have proved themselves as a band who can write memorable songs, share that energy live and create a community of like-minded fans but they've always been missing one important element: An album. Luckily the band's full-length The Things We Do To Find People Who Feel Like Us is the culmination of their collective career and picks up where their two critically acclaimed 7-inches, 2014's Cheap Thrills On A Dead End Street and Who Would Ever Want Something So Broken? left off.

The feelings of youth and vulnerability lie at the core of Beach Slang's music, which is part punk, part pop and all catharsis. It references the ghosts of the Replacements but keeps one foot firmly rooted in the present. It's fun and it's serious. It's sad but it isn't. It's Beach Slang. This Philadelphia-based act have built their hype the old-fashioned way, without any gimmicks or marketing teams, which makes sense when you consider that frontman and writer James Alex cut his teeth in the celebrated pop-punk act Weston while drummer JP Flexner, bassist Ed McNulty and guitarist Ruben Gallego also played in buzzed about projects such as Ex-Friends, Nona and Glocca Morra respectively. However there's something indefinable about Beach Slang's music that evokes the spirit of punk and juxtaposes it into something that's as brutally honest as it is infectiously catchy.

"By and large we subscribe to the idea of "if it isn't broken, we're not going to fix it' so, yeah, we came at this recording in very much the same way," Alex explains when asked how they approached the new songs from a sonic perspective. "I mean, we had more time to make this album, which is a cool thing, but time can also be a strange overthinker. Really, we've just always wanted to make our things sound like well recorded live records." he continues, adding that the biggest difference this time around is the fact that engineer Dave Downham stepped up to co-produce this album and the fact that the band has finally found a full-time fourth member in guitarist Ruben Gallego. "Having both of them and their ears involved definitely helped a lot. I hardly listen back to things in the studio. For me, if it feels right, it's a keeper. But, yeah, there's something pretty alright about striking a balance."

Obviously there has been demand for a Beach Slang album since they exploded onto the scene, however the band was very careful not to rush out something before it was totally ready. "I write every day regardless of what else is happening. And what we wanted to make happen was as many live shows as possible. There's an importance in that, a necessity. Rock & roll isn't meant to exist on computer screens, you know?" Correspondingly the hundreds of shows that the band played between this album and the EP is all now automatically embedded in their recorded output. "I'm hardly concerned about our music being technically precise. I want to make sure it has soul, that it's honest. The imperfections…that's the really good stuff. We don't ever want it to be perfect."

While The Things We Do To Find People Who Feel Like Us further expands on Beach Slang's unique sound, it also showcases their sonic diversity. From the shoegazing sheen of "Noisy Heaven" to the downbeat dreaminess of "Porno Love" and refracted rage of "Young & Alive," the album is a fuzzed-out masterpiece that takes influence from the past while staying rooted in the present. "Certainly we are going to sound like Beach Slang because, you know, we are but we didn't want to make this record a xerox of anything we've done. That stuff has no guts, you know?," Alex explains. "Even if you go from the first EP to the second EP there's a nice, little arc and range of things happening. I think that's even more true of this record."

"There's a line in that first song 'Throwaways' that goes 'there's a time to bleed and a time just to fucking run": I've sung that line so many times between developing and writing the thing and I still get that little-hair-standing-up-on-my-arm moment every time I say it," Alex says. It's probably because the sentiments that he's expressing have never been a choice. "Certainly there's an element of nostalgia inherent in the writing because a good bit is reflective but it never lodges in the past; it's more of a battle cry to now and where we're going. Look, growing up and getting serious is wildly overrated stuff. Don't listen to it. Jump around with a guitar. Play records loud. Never retire from being alive. Move on it."

That movement is alternately beautiful and crushing. It's blazing and plodding, silent and deafening but always progressing and pushing toward that barely visible beacon in the horizon. The Things We Do To Find People Who Feel Like Us is just a giant step closer to our destination.
Positive No
As it turns out, Positive No isn't really a band, it is a remedy.

Positive No started in the confines of a living room in Richmond, Virginia. Songwriter and guitarist Kenny Close began home recording a series of songs over a Christmas vacation. These were shared with Tracy Wilson who in August of that year was hit by a car while crossing the street and was on a long path to recovery. While gaining the strength to be able to walk again and coping with a newly acquired brain injury, she began adding vocals to these songs. This creative process became an important distraction and therapy for Wilson. The intention was never to start a band but once the demo process began in the winter of 2011, the songwriting chemistry snowballed into a series of new songs the two wrote together. Drummer and friend Willis Thompson brought this duo to a trio and then after a series of bass players, this four piece band has been recently rounded out by Sadie Powers. After several years in the band Thompson recently left Positive No and James O'Neill has taken over his drum throne.

Their debut 5 song EP entitled Via Florum was recorded at Magpie Cage with J Robbins (Jawbox / Burning Airlines / Office of Future Plans) and was released on Wilson's record label Little Black Cloud Records in 2013. The line up for this recording included Kenneth Close, Tracy Wilson, Willis Thompson, and James Menefee. A 7" single was recorded for the Negative Fun Records singles club in 2014 (with bass player Andre Phillips) and in 2015 the band returned back to Magpie Cage to record their first full length record Glossa with the original Via Florum line up.

So where exactly did the members of Positive No come from? The band's family tree is well rooted. Kenny has played guitar in a series of noisy indie rock bands from Virginia since the mid '90s. Tracy was the singer in the '90s post hardcore band Dahlia Seed (Theologian/ Troubleman) but has also recorded under the solo moniker Ringfinger over the past 5 years (Magic Bullet Records / Little Black Cloud). Sadie Powers is a long time member of Richmond's synth-pop group Dead Fame. James O'Neill is currently playing in two other bands, Snowy Owls (shoegaze) and Plain Scrap (think Hot Snakes). Positive No may have a confounding combination of styles in their songwriting background, but together they create melodic, unpredictable pop balanced with tension and energy. For those unfamiliar with the band's musical pedigree it would be tempting to suggest they pay heavy tribute to a time when Velocity Girl's singer was rumored to have eloped with the drummer of Sunny Day Real Estate (yes, that was real gossip from back in the day), but in fairness, half of this band has been making music since the mid '90s and have influenced some of the musicians they have been compared to.

With Close and Wilson remaining the core songwriting team, the past year of creating Glossa had its own set of challenges. This time it was Kenny with a seemingly endless string of health hurdles. A sprained foot appeared from thin air in August of 2014 and it spiraled into months of intense leg pain that led to difficulties in walking or standing (goodbye playing live performances). The pain mysteriously spread to much of his body, an X-Ray revealed a shifted pelvis and spine, and then Kenny collapsed in November in what looked like a seizure but was diagnosed as a Vasovagal response. During these 9 months of set backs and slow healing, Glossa was written and recorded. Music once again provided a much needed emotional outlet and necessary diversion between doctor visits and PT.

Spring has arrived and at the end of this long dark tunnel comes 12 new songs and a truly refreshed band. Positive No is back and will be touring in the fall to support their new record.
Venue Information:
The Broadberry
2729 W. Broad Street
Richmond, VA, 23220
http://www.thebroadberry.com