SLEEPWALKERS

SLEEPWALKERS

Tinnarose, Minor Poet

Fri, December 28, 2018

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

The Broadberry

Richmond, VA

$15

Tickets at the Door

This event is all ages

Venue Information: 

Parking is available in side lot (by Exxon)

No Smoking/Vaping permitted anywhere inside venue

Bags/purses will be checked at the door. 

Must have ID for entry 

If you do not have access to a printer, we can scan ticket from your cell phone. Be sure to have your brightness turned all the way up at the door. 

Children under 3 years old are Free. 

Kitchen is open during all hours of operation. 

For additonal FAQs click here

SLEEPWALKERS
SLEEPWALKERS
"The treatment. Act 1. The York brothers. Richmond, Virginia. Completely saturated in rock and roll dreams, young Austin and Michael attend countless shows up and down the east coast with an older sister. Driven to start bands of their own, success comes early but remains incomplete. Major labels knock on the teenagers’ door for big city showcases even as the music industry slides into chaos. When the light of “getting signed” grows dim, the group falls apart and the brothers tumble into a creative funk. Enter a wise old friend with a massive record collection, serving as guru, nurturing them into wider musical appreciation, and providing a clear head space to start over. Cut to the farm, a gem of a rural studio, where they meet audio engineer and drummer Alex De Jong, kindred spirit and equally intuitive musical force. Something clicks as they work together to demo new material, nightlights go off above their heads, and Sleepwalkers is born screaming.
Sleepwalkers delivers a parallel aural experience, shifting narratives populated by heroes and villains, lost love and love found, neon landscapes and windswept skyscrapers. The follow-up to Sleepwalkers’ ‘60s fantasia, cult-favorite debut, Greenwood Shade (2014), "Wake Up" and "Reasons To Give Up In You" feel equally effortless, backed by the band’s facility with the structures and language of pop music. These specific references, from Whitney Houston to Thin Lizzy, come so furiously fast and from so many different angles–production, singing, writing, arrangement, engineering–that the songs are never weighed down or overshadowed by their inspirations. An aesthetic based primarily on exhilaration.
Sometimes when you let go of a dream, it comes back to you, and you realize that you weren’t ready for it before. It is significant that Spacebomb, a label built on production and musicianship is releasing a record they have no direct hand in making. No need to improve on this maximalist pop masterpiece. In the Yorks and De Jong, the label recognized peers, with a unique process of their own, an equal love and knowledge of recording history, appreciation for all those high-watermarks across genre, an astonishing live band possessing a sound both stadium-filling and soul-nourishing, proven over tours supporting J. Roddy Walston & The Business, The Lumineers, and The Shins. Fantastic natural songwriting, personal experience amplified to a broad lyricism, uncompromising sincerity and uncompromising commitment to ‘having a fine evening,’ all of it steeped in the vernacular culture of Richmond. Cue the theme song, play the montage. Sleepwalkers is the story of some hard-working boys, whose talent and love of music sustained them, whose belief in each other carried them through."
Minor Poet
Minor Poet
After spending years writing and recording music by himself in various bedrooms and basements, Andrew Carter hit his stride with the debut Minor Poet album, And How!. Made on a creative whim with no outside expectations, the eleven-song collection combined Carter’s love of carefully-crafted pop with a loose, fun, off-the-cuff recording aesthetic. The album was released in 2017 and developed a small but loving fan base, and Minor Poet has grown from a passion project into a cross-country touring band with write-ups in publications such as American Songwriter, Magnet, The Wild Honey Pie, Impose, and more.

Minor Poet’s second album, The Good News, is a six-song collection that expands the boundaries of what constitutes the band’s sound. In just twenty-two minutes, the songs take apart the standard formulas of guitar-based rock and infuse them with vibrance and energy. On opener “Tabula Rasa,” interlocking guitars and a Farfisa organ carry the song through until everything drops suddenly into a doo-wop section that wouldn’t be out of place on a 1950’s greatest hits compilation. Warped noise envelops a tropicalia-flavored Casio beat in “Tropic of Cancer” before a slick groove and sliding bass line lead into the chorus’ pure pop bliss of of horns and vocal harmonies. “Museum District” begins with a drum intro reminiscent of an off-kilter “Be My Baby,” and “Bit Your Tongue/All Alone Now” features a midsection with a glam-rock guitar solo amidst trumpet fanfare. These are a just a few of the infectious moments on an EP filled with many more.

The Good News was made over four days at Montrose Recording, in Minor Poet’s hometown of Richmond, VA. In the past, Carter played all the instruments and handled all the production, but he knew he that he had to reach outside himself to do justice to these songs. “I couldn’t capture the sounds I heard in my head,” Carter explains. “I wanted something that was vast and expansive but that at the same time could hit you immediately in the gut.” Paying homage to the “wall of sound” techniques made famous by Brian Wilson and Phil Spector, Carter and co-producer Adrian Olsen (Natalie Prass, Foxygen) overdubbed layer after layer of Carter playing an array of guitars, pianos, organs, synths, and percussion, as well as singing all the harmonies. The members of Minor Poet’s touring band were brought in to perform the core rhythm section, and local musicians stopped by to add crucial flourishes, such as the harmonizing guitar riffs in “Reverse Medusa” and the saxophone solo that closes out “Nude Descending Staircase.”

At the center of everything is Carter’s voice, singing lyrics that seamlessly mix allusions to religion, mythology, art, and philosophy as he questions himself, his place in the world around him, what he owes to his relationships, and, in turn, what he needs to ask of others in order to stay healthy. Tabula Rasa is a concept that argues that humans are born blank slates, shaped through experience and environment. The last two years couldn’t have felt more applicable for Carter, who started out as a fresh face with little-to-no experience in the music industry and slowly grew into himself as a stage performer and bandleader through both good and bad times. During this period he began to come to terms with lifelong struggles, such as the depression that permeates “Tropic of Cancer” and the social anxiety that runs through “Museum District.” Rather than be one-dimensional, however, Carter dives deeper into himself and his motivations, such as in “Reverse Medusa” when he sings, “Hide my love in poetic half-truths/never was one to dwell on my issues.” Carter’s ability to balance emotional honesty with a tongue-in-cheek self awareness adds to the richness and originality of the music. Short but memorable, catchy yet meaningful, The Good News is another promising step forward for Minor Poet.
Venue Information:
The Broadberry
2729 W. Broad Street
Richmond, VA, 23220
http://www.thebroadberry.com